Sandwiched between the continental divide and a spectacular array of 13-
and 14,000-foot mountains, Summit County boasts the highest elevation
stretch of I-70 as it crosses central Colorado.

With four world-class ski resorts, multiple 14ers, one of the main
headwaters of the Colorado River, and an endless amount of alpine
terrain, there is a reason it’s called Summit County.

At the center of Summit you’ll find Lake Dillon – a sizeable
reservoir home to the highest elevation sailing regattas in the world.
Surrounding the lake is a conglomeration of mountain towns including
Silverthorne, Frisco, and Dillon.

bm-sunrise-lake-dillionSunrise over Lake Dillion

With a winding shoreline and many small islands, the reservoir is the
spot to go for a shoreline hike or scenic paddleboard. Bring your own
or rent gear out of the Frisco Bay Marina and take the north shoreline
for a quarter mile to find a series of small archipelagos.

Head East

Head 30 minutes east and you’re on the continental divide. Highway 6
takes you up to Loveland Pass at nearly 12,000-feet, while winding past
both Keystone and Arapahoe Basin ski areas. Take your pick: ski the
resort, run car laps on the pass, or get a good start exploring the
immense amount of alpine terrain around Grays and Torreys – the twin
14ers that loom over Summit.

Arapahoe Basin, or A-Basin as it’s more commonly referred to, is
famous for being the Colorado’s first and last chair every ski season
and the parties that come with such momentous occasions. It also boasts
an amazing variety of off-piste lift access and steep descents on the
towering West Wall.

Head West

I-70 takes you West to Copper Mountain, where you have the option to
head up Vail Pass or take the road less traveled to Freemont Pass,
eventually ending up in Leadville – the highest incorporated town in the
US.

bm-vail-passVail Pass Powder. Photo: Ben Markhart

15 minutes from Summit, Vail Pass provides access to miles of groomed
trails popular with the slednecks and sled-skiers alike. With
snow-machine access restricted to the groomed trails, there are endless
stashes of powder left untouched for the human powered.

Head toward Freemont Pass and you’ll be up against the east side of
the Mosquito Range. Here you’ll find easy access to get as high as you
can handle. This zone boasts numerous popular alpine summits and ski
objectives with almost no approach, as well as four 14ers – Mt. Lincoln,
Mt. Democrat, Mt. Quandary, and Mt. Bross.

Check out the Mayflower Gulch trail-head for easy access to the alpine on this side of the range – winter or summer.

Sandwiched between the continental divide and a
spectacular array of 13- and 14,000-foot mountains, Summit County boasts
the highest elevation stretch of I-70 as it crosses central Colorado.

With four world-class ski resorts, multiple 14ers, one of the main
headwaters of the Colorado River, and an endless amount of alpine
terrain, there is a reason it’s called Summit County.

At the center of Summit you’ll find Lake Dillon – a sizeable
reservoir home to the highest elevation sailing regattas in the world.
Surrounding the lake is a conglomeration of mountain towns including
Silverthorne, Frisco, and Dillon.

bm-sunrise-lake-dillionSunrise over Lake Dillion

With a winding shoreline and many small islands, the reservoir is the
spot to go for a shoreline hike or scenic paddleboard. Bring your own
or rent gear out of the Frisco Bay Marina and take the north shoreline
for a quarter mile to find a series of small archipelagos.

Head East

Head 30 minutes east and you’re on the continental divide. Highway 6
takes you up to Loveland Pass at nearly 12,000-feet, while winding past
both Keystone and Arapahoe Basin ski areas. Take your pick: ski the
resort, run car laps on the pass, or get a good start exploring the
immense amount of alpine terrain around Grays and Torreys – the twin
14ers that loom over Summit.

Arapahoe Basin, or A-Basin as it’s more commonly referred to, is
famous for being the Colorado’s first and last chair every ski season
and the parties that come with such momentous occasions. It also boasts
an amazing variety of off-piste lift access and steep descents on the
towering West Wall.

Head West

I-70 takes you West to Copper Mountain, where you have the option to
head up Vail Pass or take the road less traveled to Freemont Pass,
eventually ending up in Leadville – the highest incorporated town in the
US.

bm-vail-passVail Pass Powder. Photo: Ben Markhart

15 minutes from Summit, Vail Pass provides access to miles of groomed
trails popular with the slednecks and sled-skiers alike. With
snow-machine access restricted to the groomed trails, there are endless
stashes of powder left untouched for the human powered.

Head toward Freemont Pass and you’ll be up against the east side of
the Mosquito Range. Here you’ll find easy access to get as high as you
can handle. This zone boasts numerous popular alpine summits and ski
objectives with almost no approach, as well as four 14ers – Mt. Lincoln,
Mt. Democrat, Mt. Quandary, and Mt. Bross.

Check out the Mayflower Gulch trailhead for easy access to the alpine on this side of the range – winter or summer.

bm-mt-democratTurns on Mt. Democrat. Photo: Ben Markhart

Head South

South will take you past Breckenridge ski area and up to Hoosier
Pass. Hoosier heads over the Mosquito range, putting you opposite
Freemont Pass, and provides just as easy access. Many people cut their
14er skiing teeth off Hoosier Pass, with easy access to Quandary and
Bross – two of the more mellow 14ers.

If you want a more involved day, try the Lincoln-Democrat-Cameron
link up. From the Kite Lake Trailhead it’s only a 7.3-mile round trip –
probably the best bang for your buck when it comes to peak bagging
anywhere in Colorado.

bm-lincoln-fallsOne of Lincoln Fall’s great flows. Photo: Ben Markhart

Just over Hoosier, you’ll also find the Lincoln Falls ice climbing
area. With only a 20-minute approach, this is a fantastic venue to learn
a little about swinging tools. While moderate in nature, Lincoln boasts
a number of multi-pitch flows up to WI3, the longest stretching closer
to 400-feet. Careful on the weekends though; the easy access and
moderate grades mean the typical inundation of weekend warriors.

Head North

Taking Highway 9 out of Summit will get you to the Colorado River and
some of the best stretches for Class II-III floats. Start in Rancho Del
Rio and float to the State Bridge or Twin Bridges Launch for a nice
short day.

bm-rancho-paddle-2Flat water section downstream from Rancho Del Rio. Photo: Ben Markhart

Farther north of Rancho you’ll find some more involved rapids into
the Class III range depending on the water level. With only short
sections of Class III and a lot of flat water, this is a great trip to
mix a little excitement with a leisurely float.

bm-rancho-paddle-3Heading through a fun whitewater section on the upper Colorado River. Photo: Ben Markhart

Pumphouse Launch to Rancho is a great run and you can even continue
down to State Bridge. This stretch will take you past the Radium Hot
Spring – a natural spring that only emerges when the river level drops,
revealing a set of hand-built soaking pools that mix spring and river
water.

Head to summit county and take your pick. Some of the most popular recreation destinations around the county include:

Breckenridge

Keystone Ski Area

Arapahoe Basin Ski Area

Vail Ski Area

Loveland Pass

Take your pick: ski the
resort, run car laps on the pass, or get a good start exploring the
immense amount of alpine terrain around Grays and Torreys – the twin
14ers that loom over Summit.

Copper Mountain

Vail Pass

15 minutes from Summit, Vail
Pass provides access to miles of groomed trails popular with the
slednecks and sled-skiers alike. With snow-machine access restricted to
the groomed trails, there are endless stashes of powder left untouched
for the human powered.

Freemont Pass

Here you’ll find easy access
to get as high as you can handle. This zone boasts numerous popular
alpine summits and ski objectives with almost no approach, as well as
four 14ers – Mt. Lincoln, Mt. Democrat, Quandary Peak, and Mt. Bross.

Mayflower Gulch Trailhead

Easiest access to the east side of the Mosquito Range.

Hoosier Pass

Many people cut their 14er skiing teeth off Hoosier Pass, with easy access to Quandary and Bross – two of the more mellow 14ers.

Kite Lake Trailhead

Start of the 7.3-mile round-trip Lincoln-Democrat-Cameron link up

Parking for Lincoln Falls

Lincoln boasts a number of multi-pitch flows up to WI3, the longest stretching closer to 400-feet.

Rancho Del Rio – Colorado River Put-in

Start at Rancho Del Rio and float to the State Bridge or Twin Bridges Launch for a nice short day.

State Bridge – Colorado River Take-out

Twin Bridges – Colorado River Take-out

Pump House Boat Launch – Colorado River

Short sections of class III mixed with flat water.

Frisco Bay Marina

Silverthorne, CO

Frisco, CO

Dillion, CO

It’s a wild wonderful world to be explored out there! Whatever you do in Summit County, enjoy yourself, have fun and be safe!

Mountain Life Real Estate / Mountain Life Brokers

Toll-free: 800 805 2830

Denver: 303 952 5051

Summit: 970 368 2008

Vail: 970 360 7206

info@MountainLifeCompanies.com

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